PSA: Be REALLY careful you don’t scratch your acrylic!


Lettering on acrylic is a great way to practice your calligraphy and lettering skills and get you geared up for windows and other display signage. So this week, I want to delve into what TO use and what NOT to use when working with this medium!

Before we get started, I just want to note that although it’s ok to use a Stabilo Aquarellable Pencil when marking up a mirror or other glass surface, I’m going to say it again, acrylic scratches suuuuuper easily.

First things first…

Tools

For more on supplies, click here for my free 50-page guide!

Grab the free supplies guide here!

Prefer to watch than read? Feel free to skip right to the video and see these in real-time! 👇🏻


NOTE: this next part is going to assume that you know your calligraphy basic strokes. IF YOU DON’T, you need to watch THIS VIDEO right away…. seriously. Stop this video right now and watch this one first!!!!

Now let’s get started!

You’ll notice in the images below, as we get down to the last one, the letters go from really opaque to barely opaque at all.

In order of easiest removal, we have:

The Bistro Chalk Marker
The Sharpie Water-Based Paint Pen
The Posca Paint Pen
The Sharpie Oil-Based Paint Pen
The Molotow One4All Acrylic Paint Pen

Now for the removal process!

The easiest to remove is, of course, the chalk marker, and you can easily remove it with a simple dry paper towel wrapped around your finger. Just swipe across and voila!

A great option when your client wants to reuse their acrylic!
The next durable options are water-based and the Posca pen. A little extra pressure is needed here in order to remove.

Spray a little Windex…

…and the top three are going, going, gone!

The oil and acrylic, however, need a liiitttllllee more elbow grease, which is great if you are looking for more permanent display options!

Now if you make a mistake or for some reason need to remove either of these two, good ol’ acetone does the trick!

It’s super easy and quick to remove with acetone, as you can see, although not the most eco-friendly option.

If you are looking for a less stinky, more eco-friendly option, coconut oil works to remove these last two as well. It does take a bit more time, but it will come off!

Once you’re acrylic is sans calligraphy, spray a little more Windex on it and it’s as good as new again!


Hopefully, that was helpful for you and gives you some clarity on what pens are best to use on acrylic depending on your project!

And if you’re someone who is interested in making lots of lettering signs for any types of events – chalkboards, wood, glass…acrylic – I have a brand new course called:

Signing Up!

Get it…SIGNing Up…like signs. But also, you should sign up…

This course is ALL about signs, with all of my tips and tricks and lots of different resources in there. Go to www.signingupcourse.com and check it out!